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Stanley Kubrick and Quentin Tarantino both launched their careers by updating the noir tradition. In the first episode of a two-part comparative analysis, Clute and Edwards demonstrate how Kubrick's "The Killing" (1956) and Tarantino's "Reservoir Dogs" (1992) come more clearly into focus when each is viewed through the lens of the other. "The Killing" might be considered a masterwork on its own merits. Kubrick's careful composition of every shot demonstrates his deep sympathy for noir tradition, but he adds much that is new: a non-linear narrative more fractured than any previously attempted; an omniscient voice-over and inventive sound design to guide the viewer through the non-linear tale; the staging of a playful self-consciousness; an element of chance that ultimately trumps self-determination or fate as the most powerful force in the noir universe. In short, Kubrick opens the door for Tarantino. This podcast is brought to you by Clute and Edwards of www.noircast.net. To leave a comment on this episode, or make a donation to the podcast, please visit "Out of the Past: Investigating Film Noir" at outofthepast.libsyn.com.
Direct download: OOTP_2006_03_15_TK.mp3
Category:Movies -- posted at: 5:01 AM
Comments[2]

  • Timothy Carey made this movie for me. The tension in his scenes is amazing.

    posted by: Mike White on 2008-05-21 13:31:00

  • Tarantino\'s fascination with film noir vaguely borders along the lines of obsession. Frankly, I can\'t think of a more influential cinematic genre that offered directors so many creative cinematic techniques and visual nuances. Reservoir Dogs is virtually a remake of Phil Karlson\'s 1952 \"Kansas City Confidential\" as Pulp Fiction is a revamped makeover of the Robert Siodmak 1946\'s noir classic, \"The Killers,\" - both films even open with the famous diner scene. Kubrick\'s \"The Killing\" is one of the most taut, and suspenseful heist movies ever made and the film\'s dramatic ending still takes your breath away.

    posted by: Richard Gressler on 2006-06-13 10:29:00

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